restlessandcr8ive:


Hathor was worshipped by both men and women in ancient Egypt. Devotees of the Goddess were mostly dancers, musicians, and artisans. Dance and music were the sacred arts of Hathor and Hathor was thought to be the incarnation of dance. Her worshippers would often tell tales about how Hathor would cheer up Ra with her dancing. Hathor was often invoked in much the same manner as the Greek Muses were, to inspire the artist. Meanwhile, Hathor was known as the mistress of the western desert, where the necropolis was located, and would, therefore, be of assistance to the deceased. She is frequently referred to in the Coffin Texts and the Book of the Dead. It is to her that the deceased comes upon entering the Afterlife, and it is she who will anoint him and give him life among the dead. Much like Isis, Hathor is a multi-purpose Goddess. Her special energy is related to the arts, though. 

remember the story when Moses broke the 10 commandments and they were worshiping the golden calf?

restlessandcr8ive:

Hathor was worshipped by both men and women in ancient Egypt. Devotees of the Goddess were mostly dancers, musicians, and artisans. Dance and music were the sacred arts of Hathor and Hathor was thought to be the incarnation of dance. Her worshippers would often tell tales about how Hathor would cheer up Ra with her dancing. Hathor was often invoked in much the same manner as the Greek Muses were, to inspire the artist. 

Meanwhile, Hathor was known as the mistress of the western desert, where the necropolis was located, and would, therefore, be of assistance to the deceased. She is frequently referred to in the Coffin Texts and the Book of the Dead. It is to her that the deceased comes upon entering the Afterlife, and it is she who will anoint him and give him life among the dead. Much like Isis, Hathor is a multi-purpose Goddess. Her special energy is related to the arts, though. 

remember the story when Moses broke the 10 commandments and they were worshiping the golden calf?